Daniella Drummond-Barbosa

Daniella Drummond-Barbosa

The Drummond-Barbosa lab investigates how whole-body physiology influences the activity of tissue-resident stem cells using the Drosophila ovary system. They are currently identifying adipocyte and brain factors that contribute to the control of germline stem cells and their differentiating progeny in response to changes in diet or other stimuli. 


Andrew Ewald

Andrew Ewald

Dr. Ewald has spent the past decade developing imaging, genetic, and 3D organotypic culture techniques to enable real-time analysis of cell behavior and molecular function in breast cancer. As a graduate student in Scott Fraser’s Lab at Caltech he utilized his physics training to develop and apply novel light microscopy approaches to reveal cellular interactions within intact tissues in real-time. During Dr. Ewald’s postdoctoral studies in Zena Werb’s Lab at UCSF, he developed novel 3D organotypic culture and imaging techniques to reveal the cellular mechanisms and molecular regulation of morphogenesis in primary normal and neoplastic mammary epithelia.  His laboratory seeks to understand how epithelial cancer cells escape their normal developmental constraints and acquire the ability to invade and disseminate into normal tissues.


Philip Jordan

Philip Jordan

Research in the Jordan laboratory focuses on understanding the molecular mechanisms regulating DNA repair, chromosome segregation and cell cycle progression. Their lab studies the importance of Structural Maintenance of Chromosomes (SMC) complexes and cell cycle kinases, particularly Polo-like (PLK) kinases and Aurora kinases. The Jordan lab uses mouse and human pluripotent stem cells to help define the function of these proteins within essential molecular pathways of the cell. They also use mouse as a model organism to study consequences of gene mutation and chromosome missegregation, which give rise to physical and mental developmental defects, infertility and cancer predisposition. Current research from the Jordan laboratory encompasses the following:
1) Gametogenesis (spermatogenesis and oogenesis)
2) Pluripotent stem cell preservation, proliferation, and differentiation
3) Neurodevelopment